See the Fall Colours in Ontario

 

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Autumn in Ontario, Canada brings trees decked out in all their finest multi-colored leaves. One of the best ways to enjoy the fall colours in Ontario is to get in the car and explore. Here’s a baker’s dozen of the best routes to follow.

Best Driving Routes to Enjoy Fall Colours in Ontario

Fall Colours in Ontario Rednersville Road
Rednersville Road. Photo by John M Smith

Prince Edward County

A casual autumn drive in my own neighbourhood is always a treat.  A nice loop tour includes the Rednersville Road from Rossmore to Carrying Place, Highway #33 to Wellington and Bloomfield, then highway #62 back to Rossmore.

Alternately, at Bloomfield, you could continue east to Lake on the Mountain and the Glenora ferry. Then, drive alongside the lake all the way to Bath or Kingston.

Visit www.pecounty.on.ca.

Fall colours reflected in lake near Frankford Ontario
Near Frankford. Photo by John M Smith

Oak Hills

In the fall, my wife and I enjoy a drive through the Oak Hills, near Stirling. For a pleasant loop tour, I’d recommend including Frankford and Batawa as well. Another option is to drive on a loop that includes Springbrook, Marmora, and Madoc.

See www.hastingscounty.com.

Fall colours in Ontario Presqu’ile Provincial Park
Presqu’ile Provincial Park

Northumberland

Another drive in our own neck of the woods will take you along Lake Ontario’s north shore to Presqu’ile Provincial Park, Brighton, Colborne, Grafton, and Cobourg. Complete the loop by heading northeast to Roseneath and Warkworth.

Visit www.northumberlandcounty.ca

The fall colours in Ontario are spectacular and the best way to see them is by car or train. Here's a list of drives for Ontario leaf-peeping. #Ontarioinfall #fallcoloursinontario

Actinolite and Napanee Loop

Take route #37 from Belleville to Tweed and Actinolite, route #7 northeast to Kaladar, then #41 south to Napanee before completing the loop.

Just before arriving at Napanee, you might decide to stop at Hell Hole on Centreville Road where you’ll find a well-signed nature trail on private property. This will take you to the hole in the earth, where a ladder will take you down into Hell (a cool, dark, underground cave).

Ontario Bon Echo Provincial Park
Bon Echo Provincial Park

Bon Echo Provincial Park

At Actinolite, continue north on route #41 to Bon Echo Provincial Park. Here you’ll find the towering Mazinaw Rock and many native pictographs. You’ll also find some great canoe routes in this area.

Check out www.ontarioparks.com/park/bonecho

Thousand Islands Ontario
Thousand Islands

Kingston and the Thousand Islands

Take the Old Perth Road to Westport then make a nice loop tour that takes you to Chaffey’s Locks, Charleston Lake, and Gananoque. You might even decide to add an autumn colour cruise in the Thousand Islands to this road trip.

Check out www.rideau-info.com and www.thousandislands.com

Fall Colours in Ontario Algonquin Highway
Algonquin Highway. Photo by John M Smith

Algonquin Provincial Park

One of my all-time favourite autumn drives is right through the park (on #60). On one autumn trip there, I had to stop twice for moose. You can also prolong your visit by camping, cycling, or hiking within this beautiful setting.

Don’t forget to stop at the Visitor Centre for yet another spectacular view. You can make this a nice loop tour by driving south of the park, through Haliburton, and back to Bancroft.

Visit www.algonquinpark.on.ca

Haliburton Ontario
Haliburton

Haliburton Highlands

In this region of lakes and forests, check out the Panorama Lookout on South Lake Road (at Minden). Then enjoy a loop tour that includes visits to Peterborough, Lindsay, Fenelon Falls, Bobcaygeon, and the village of Haliburton itself.

Visit www.haliburtoncounty.ca

Muskoka Ontario
Muskoka

Muskoka

With its hardwood forests and plethora of lakes, this area attracts a lot of autumn visitors, so expect some crowds.  You can take #400 and #11 to Gravenhurst, Bracebridge, and Huntsville (where Lion’s Lookout offers you a great view of the area).

The nearby Dorset Lookout Tower overlooks the Lake of Bays.

Visit www.discovermuskoka.ca

The Ontario Ghost Road

The Old Rosseau-Nipissing Colonization Road was one of a network of roads devised by the provincial government to encourage settlement of the area. This was to aid the large lumber companies with better access and to provide this flourishing business with a built-in workforce.

Although this drive is further away and more challenging I found it to be very scenic and historically interesting. This rugged road began in Rosseau (southwest of Huntsville) in 1864 and ran parallel to what’s now route #11. It now passes through several ghost towns, including Seguin Falls, Spence, and Rye.

For more information: www.nipissingroad.ca

Fall Colours in Ontario
Fall Colours in Ontario. Photo by John M Smith

Ottawa Valley

Northwest of our nation’s capital city, you’ll find this region of wilderness, waterways, and woodlands.  Take a loop tour that includes Calabogie, Renfrew, Wilno (Canada’s oldest Polish settlement), Barry’s Bay, and Foymount (where you can get a stunning, panoramic view of the region).

Check out www.ottawavalley.org

The Near North

Begin this tour in North Bay and head north to Temagami, Cobalt, and New Liskeard. For an extended tour, you could drive further northwest, to Timmins, then south to Sudbury, and east back to North Bay.  There’s a captivating train excursion for those fall colours in Ontario between North Bay and Temagami.

Agawa Canyon Ontario
Agawa Canyon

Agawa Canyon

No list of routes to see fall colours in Ontario would be complete without including this popular wilderness excursion on the Algoma Central Railway. You’ll depart from Sault Ste Marie and the train trip will include a stop on the canyon floor where you can hike or picnic.

For information visit www.agawatrain.com

Book This Trip

There are, of course, many other options for seeing the fall colours in Ontario, so if you don’t choose one of these listed here, then simply select some intriguing route of your own design.  The main thing is to just get out there and enjoy the magnificent beauty.

After all, it may be a long time before you’ll have bare, clear roads again, for there’s a rumor that ‘the white stuff’ is coming just around the corner.

Author Bio: John is a freelance travel writer and photographer who enjoys travelling the world and writing about his adventures. He has written weekly travel features for a group of community newspapers, presented several travelogues, and is the author of two major cycling books: “Cycling Canada” and “Cycling the USA”

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